Hmm actually this song was taught to me by my primary school teacher.. Later on in life when I was working overseas far away from home. I just started to feel so much for the lyrics.

This was an American folk song that was made popular during the 1960s folk revival. I understand that it was first sang by a group known as “The Journey Men” and it was also translated to French and it was titled “J’entends siffler le train” and was sang by a singer called Richard

Since then it was sang by many folk and country music groups as well as the famous Elvis Presley.

This song was known by other names such as “500 Miles Away From Home” and “Railroaders’ Lament”

Personally I felt very much for the lyrics now especially because now i am more than 500 miles away from home 500 miles is simply an understatement in fact I am 781 miles away from home (* according to www.travelmath.com) . But I certainly hope i won’t be like the traveller in this song, who is far from home, penniless and too ashamed to return home.

I was very tempted to put the originals by the Kingston Trio or Journey Men, but I find the version sang with Elvis Presley closer to the tune I heard when I was a kid. So I decided to use that version.

Title: Five Hundred Miles
Composer :Hedy West
Artist:: Various
Featured: 500 Miles (In A Private Moment) By Elvis Presley

If you miss the train I’m on, you will know that I am gone
You can hear the whistle blow a hundred miles,
A hundred miles, a hundred miles, a hundred miles, a hundred miles,
You can hear the whistle blow a hundred miles.

Lord I’m one, Lord I’m two, Lord I’m three, Lord I’m four,
Lord I’m five hundred miles away from home..
Away from home, away from home, away from home, away from home
Lord I’m five hundred miles away from home.

Not a shirt on my back, not a penny to my name
Lord I can’t go back home this a-way
This a-away, this a-way, this a-way, this a-way,
Lord I can’t go back-home this a-way.

If you miss the train I’m on you will know that I am gone
You can hear the whistle blow a hundred miles.
A hundred miles, a hundred miles, a hundred miles, a hundred miles,
You can hear the whistle blow a hundred miles.

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